American Academy of Nursing
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American Academy of Nursing
National Coalition Launches Effort to Place 10,000 Nurses on Governing Boards by 2020

WASHINGTON, DC (November 17, 2014) — The American Academy of Nursing is pleased to be a founding member of the Nurses on Boards Coalition, a group of national nursing organizations working together to increase nurses’ presence on corporate and non-profit health-related boards of directors throughout the country. “Without a nurse trustee, boards lack an authority on the patient experience, quality and safety, and the largest part of the hospital workforce,” Trustee Magazine, a publication of the American Hospital Association, wrote recently.

The coalition will implement a national strategy to bring nurses’ valuable perspective to governing boards, as well as state-level and national commissions, with an interest in health. The goal is to put 10,000 nurses on boards by the year 2020. The effort is a direct response to the Institute of Medicine’s (IOM) report, The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health (2011), which recommended nurses play more pivotal roles on boards and commissions in improving the health of all Americans.

“The Academy is pleased to be a part of this important coalition to build the infrastructure for long term work on nurse appointments,” said Academy President Diana J. Mason.  “The work aligns with the Academy's strategic goal of positioning nurses as leaders in health and health care.  We will continue our focus on policy-related appointments at the national and state levels and support other nursing organizations in their appointment priorities.”

The effort is supported by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and AARP as part of their collaborative effort to implement the recommendations of the IOM report through the Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action.

Members of the coalition are listed below. Other organizations may choose to be a part of this important and historic coalition going forward.

AARP
American Academy of Nursing
American Assembly For Men in Nursing
American Association of Colleges of Nursing
American Association of Nurse Anesthetists
American Association of Nurse Practitioners
American Nurses Association
American Nurses Foundation
American Organization of Nurse Executives
Asian American/Pacific Islander Nurses Association
Association of Public Health Nurses
National Forum of State Nursing Workforce Centers
Jonas Center for Nursing and Veterans Healthcare
National Alaska Native American Indian Nurses Association, Inc.
National Association of Hispanic Nurses
National Black Nurses Association
National League For Nursing
National Organization for Associate Degree Nursing
National Student Nurses Association
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
Sigma Theta Tau International

The Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action seeks to promote healthier lives, supported by a system in which nurses are essential partners in providing care and promoting health. An initiative of AARP and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the Campaign works with Action Coalitions in 50 states and the District of Columbia to implement the Institute of Medicine’s Future of Nursing recommendations. Our vision is to ensure that everyone in America can live a healthier life, supported by a system in which nurses are essential partners in providing care and promoting health. The Campaign is coordinated by the Center to Champion Nursing in America, an initiative of AARP, the AARP Foundation and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

Get connected: 
www.CampaignforAction.org
www.twitter.com/Campaign4Action
www.facebook.com/CampaignForAction

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About the American Academy of Nursing

The American Academy of Nursing (www.AANnet.org) serves the public and the nursing profession by advancing health policy and practice through the generation, synthesis, and dissemination of nursing knowledge. The Academy's more than 2,300 fellows are nursing's most accomplished leaders in education, management, practice, and research. They have been recognized for their extraordinary contributions to nursing and health care.

Contact:
Cheryl Sullivan, CEO
CEO@AANnet.org
American Academy of Nursing
Washington, DC
info@aannet.org | www.AANnet.org | 202-777-1170
 
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Responding to the challenges of Ebola virus disease

In response to the continued spread of Ebola in the U.S. and other countries, the American Academy of Nursing and the American Nurses Association issue this joint statement regarding the immediate situation.

WASHINGTON, DC (October 22, 2014)—Ebola virus disease is a devastating disease that has claimed thousands of lives, primarily in three countries in West Africa. Nurses and other health care workers in that region have acquired Ebola through contact with body fluids of infected persons. Concern in the U.S. about the risk of contracting Ebola has heightened following the news that two nurses in a Dallas hospital became infected while caring for a patient with the disease.   

Nurses have a proud history of providing compassionate, quality care for patients with infectious diseases, and are at the front line of responding to the current Ebola virus disease outbreak.  In this regard, both immediate and long term activities are required.  

Clear communication, transparency, and evidence-based approaches are critical tools in combatting this disease.  Clear, accurate, consistent and up-to-date information must be made readily available to health care workers and the general public about Ebola virus disease.  This is vitally important because current practices and procedures will change as knowledge of the disease and its effective prevention and treatment continue to evolve.  

Because nurses spend the greatest amount of time in direct contact with patients, they also face the greatest personal risk if appropriate protective measures and procedures are not employed.  In carrying out their duty to care for patients, nurses must be able to practice in environments that prioritize safety – for their patients, their coworkers, and themselves. Nurses and other front-line health care workers must be provided with adequate personal protective equipment along with adequate hands-on training in how to use such equipment.

Nurses are the front line of surveillance—they are key to monitoring and detecting signs and symptoms of infection and initiating appropriate treatment and referral. Assuring that there are sufficient numbers of nurses in health care settings, communities, and public health agencies is critical to any efforts to prevent transmission of Ebola virus. Staffing decisions should take into account the demands posed by adherence to current protocols—for example, the extra time required to don and remove personal protective equipment and the need to do these with a trained observer present.  In addition, prevention of disease transmission within health care settings must be addressed from a systems perspective, identifying gaps that lead to such transmission and how to remedy them.

It is crucial that we propose these immediate responses be accompanied by a long-range commitment to protecting the public’s health from Ebola virus disease, as well as other emerging and reemerging infectious diseases.  This includes ensuring an adequate public health infrastructure and providing education about potential disease threats, as well as necessary human resources for surveillance, contact tracing and rapid referral to appropriate treatment when necessary.  These efforts will require adequate support for federal, state and local public health agencies in the U.S., and a commitment to strengthening public health resources globally. It also requires a continued commitment to developing effective treatments and vaccines, and to making these widely accessible.

Nurses must be involved in all levels of decision-making—from the point of care to the board room and at the federal, state and local levels--regarding the current response to Ebola virus disease as well as planning and preparing for outbreaks of other emerging and reemerging diseases. Nurses should also lead and implement research efforts to draw lessons from global and domestic experience with efforts to prevent and treat Ebola.

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About the Academy
The American Academy of Nursing (www.AANnet.org) serves the public and the nursing profession by advancing health policy and practice through the generation, synthesis, and dissemination of nursing knowledge. The Academy's more than 2,200 Fellows are nursing's most accomplished leaders in education, management, practice, and research. They have been recognized for their extraordinary contributions to nursing and health care.

About American Nurses Association (ANA)
ANA (www.nursingworld.org) is the only full-service professional organization representing the interests of the nation's 3.1 million registered nurses through its constituent and state nurses associations and its organizational affiliates. ANA advances the nursing profession by fostering high standards of nursing practice, promoting the rights of nurses in the workplace, projecting a positive and realistic view of nursing, and by lobbying the Congress and regulatory agencies on health care issues affecting nurses and the public.

Contacts:
Cheryl G. Sullivan
CEO, American Academy of Nursing                    
CEO@AANnet.org, 202-777-1167

Debra D. Hatmaker

Executive Director, ANA       
debbie.hatmaker@ana.org, 301-628-5059

 

 
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Have You Ever Served in the Military?
Bob Woodruff Foundation & the American Academy of Nursing Join Forces to Improve Veterans Health
The American Academy of Nursing received a generous grant from the Bob Woodruff Foundation to take its veterans health initiative, Have You Ever Served in the Military?, nationwide.

WASHINGTON, DC (September 11, 2014)— The American Academy of Nursing is proud to receive a grant for its military veterans health initiative from the Bob Woodruff Foundation (BWF).

BWF works to ensure injured veterans and their families thrive long after they return home. The team at BWJ seeks out, pulls together, and funds a nationwide network of top-tier programs and advocates working to help our heroes on the home front. The Academy is proud to join this network.

The Academy’s Have You Ever Served in the Military? is a new awareness initiative to fundamentally improve the way nurses conduct health assessments of individuals who have served in the uniformed military. The initiative is the Academy’s commitment to the First Lady’s Joining Forces campaign that calls attention to the unique health needs of service members, veterans, and their families.

Through this initiative, nurses and other healthcare providers are made aware of the importance of asking all patients if they or a family member have ever served in the military. If “yes” is the answer, the initiative’s materials ensure that providers have at their ready a series of pertinent questions to ask the veteran or family member.

Asking this simple question, “Have you ever served in the military?,” will assist providers in obtaining more complete and accurate military service histories and identify possible environmental health exposures, health factors, or illnesses related to such service. Nurses, healthcare’s boots on the ground, are uniquely positioned to bring about this fundamental and necessary change.

With the challenges confronting VA hospitals, Congress looks to the private sector to ease the VA backlog. But, as Academy president Diana Mason, PhD, RN, FAAN, cautions, “less than half of all non-VA health providers ask patients if they are veterans. The Academy’s initiative seeks to close the knowledge gap between health providers and their patients.”

The Academy launched Have You Ever Served in the Military? in ten states; now with BWF’s generosity, it has taken the initiative nationwide. Over five thousand clinics, hospitals, mental health centers, and nurse leaders in all states have received this information essential to improve the health and recovery of veterans and their families.

Receiving the grant from BWF is an honor that recognizes the dedication, focus, and effectiveness of the Academy. Working together, the American Academy of Nursing and the Bob Woodruff Foundation will improve the health and quality of life of America’s returning heroes.

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About the Bob Woodruff Foundation
You can learn more about the Bob Woodruff Foundation at bobwoodruffoundation.org. We encourage you to follow @Stand4Heroes on Twitter or like BWJ’s page on Facebook at www.facebook.com/Stand4Heroes.

About the American Academy of Nursing

The American Academy of Nursing (www.AANnet.org) serves the public and the nursing profession by advancing health policy and practice through the generation, synthesis, and dissemination of nursing knowledge. The Academy's more than 2,200 fellows are nursing's most accomplished leaders in education, management, practice, and research. They have been recognized for their extraordinary contributions to nursing and health care.

American Academy of Nursing
Washington, DC
news@aannet.org | www.AANnet.org | 202-777-1170

 
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American Academy of Nursing
Nursing Academy Announces 2014 Honorary Fellows
Supporters of nursing leadership to be inducted as Honorary Fellows in the American Academy of Nursing.

WASHINGTON, DC (September 15, 2014)— The American Academy of Nursing is composed of the most accomplished nursing leaders in education, management, and research.

The Academy, however, readily acknowledges improving health care quality and delivery requires the teamwork of extraordinary individuals outside of the nursing profession.

To honor the contributions of such extraordinary individuals, who are ineligible for regular fellowship, the Academy has created the designation of Honorary Fellows.

The Academy is pleased to announce two Honorary Fellows for 2014:

  • Mary DickowMary Dickow, MPA, is the statewide director for the California Action Coalition for the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Future of Nursing initiative at the Institute of Medicine. In this role, she has built momentum to build bridges and empower nurses throughout California.
  • Corinne H. RiederCorinne H. Rieder, EdD, is the executive director of the John A. Hartford Foundation Through her leadership, Hartford supports the work and education of geriatric nurse specialists. This support has significantly improved the health and health care of older adults in the United States.
These Honorary Fellows will be inducted at a ceremony on Saturday, October 18, 2014, in Washington, DC. The induction ceremony for these Honorary Fellows, as well as the new 2014 class of fellows, is considered the pinnacle of the American Academy of Nursing’s Transforming Health, Driving Policy Conference. For more information on the conference, visit www.AANnet.org/2014.

“Honorary Fellows understand, appreciate, and rely on the work of nurses,” says Academy president Diana Mason. “This year’s Honorary Fellows have taken great strides to advance nursing perspectives on health and health care, and I look forward to honoring them at the induction ceremony.”

To become an Honorary Fellow, an individual must be sponsored by three Academy fellows and demonstrate their extraordinary contributions to nursing and health care. The Academy’s board of directors selects only a few from many applicants to become inducted as an Honorary Fellow each year.
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About the American Academy of Nursing

The American Academy of Nursing (www.AANnet.org) serves the public and the nursing profession by advancing health policy and practice through the generation, synthesis, and dissemination of nursing knowledge. The Academy's more than 2,200 fellows are nursing's most accomplished leaders in education, management, practice, and research. They have been recognized for their extraordinary contributions to nursing and health care.

Contact:
Cheryl Sullivan
CEO@AANnet.org
American Academy of Nursing
Washington, DC
info@aannet.org | www.AANnet.org | 202-777-1170
 
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Brenda Marion Nevidjon, RN, MSN, FAAN

Pamela CiprianoBrenda Nevidjon was named the next cheif executive officer at the Oncology Nursing Society, a professional association of more than 35,000 members committed to promoting excellence in oncology nursing and the transformation of cancer care.

Nevidjon is currently a professor at the Duke University School of Nursing and coordinator of the Systems Division, which includes the nursing informatics, nursing education, and nursing and healthcare leadership graduate majors. She will start her new role at ONS on September 1.

Read the full article »

Nevidjon joined the fellowship in 2004.

 
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